Articles on Knowledge Value Mapping


Knowledge value mapping (KVM) is a conceptual tool for discussing and understanding the role of scientific research as an intricate system of relationships among institutions, groups, practitioners, and consumers that give rise to social impacts.

Following are some articles from the KT Library that address this topic. KTDRR staff reviewed a number of articles, developed a brief abstract, and assigned ratings based on strength of evidence, readability, and consumer orientation. For more information on these ratings, see KT Library Descriptor Scales.


Bozeman, B., & Rogers, J. D. (2002). A churn model of scientific knowledge value: Internet researchers as a knowledge value collective, Research Policy, 31, 769-794.     

Abstract: Bozeman and Rogers propose the "churn" theory in the value of knowledge. The theory represents a shift from the value of knowledge being based on the economic marketplace to its being based on the use (and potential use) of the knowledge. The authors contend that knowledge has no value until it is put to use. Therefore, scientific and technical work that produces many uses, thus creating new knowledge and uses, is considered to be most valued. Such knowledge is generated by "knowledge value collectives," consisting of people with varying objectives as well as individuals outside of the scientific community working across fields, disciplines, and institutions. Therefore, research should focus on the capacity of "knowledge value collectives" to produce scientific and technical knowledge with widespread uses. Note that companion articles are available in this collection entitled, "Public Value Mapping of Science Outcomes: Theory and Method" (Bozeman, 2003) and "Theoretical Consideration of Collaboration in Scientific Research" (Rogers, 2000).

Descriptor Scales

Evidence: 1 - Author(s) opinion
Consumer Orientation: C - No data
Readability: III - High (Grade 12 or above)


Bozeman, B. (2003). Public Value Mapping of science outcomes: Theory and method. Vol. 2, Sec. 1, Knowledge Flows and Knowledge Collectives: Understanding the Role of Science and Technology Policies in Development. Washington, DC: Columbia University, Center for Science, Policy and Outcomes.     

Abstract: Bozeman describes "public value mapping" (PVM), a theory and method for determining the impact of scientific research on social outcomes, which is applicable to any large-scale program with a scientific mission. Bozeman presented PVM as a tool for determining the factors impacting social outcomes and includes key questions in the article. In addition, the author noted that PVM is based on the churn model of knowledge value and is best understood in terms of "knowledge value collectives" which consist of people with varying objectives as well as individuals outside of the scientific community working across fields, disciplines, and institutions. Companion articles are available in this collection entitled, "A Churn Model of Scientific Knowledge Value: Internet Researchers as a Knowledge Value Collective" (Bozeman & Rogers, 2002) and "Theoretical Consideration of collaboration in Scientific Research" (Rogers, 2000).

Descriptor Scales

Evidence: 1 - Author(s) opinion
Consumer Orientation: C - No data
Readability: III - High (Grade 12 or above)


Loveridge, R. (1997). Social science as social reconstruction: A celebration of discontinuity or a test of the resilience of belief? Human Relations, 50(8), 879-884. source.

Abstract: Loveridge, the editor of this special 50th year anniversary issue of the journal Human Relations, traces social science scholarship and its impact from the mid- to late 20th century. In the decades after World War II, a social science theory known as "Organizational Behavior" was applied to the management and social administration of organizations. Loveridge advocates rethinking these basic assumptions and convictions on which many institutions still base their practice. This issue of Human Relations explores the issue in specific contexts, such as the United Nations, international media and non-governmental organizations. The article may be of interest to researchers with interest in knowledge value mapping, since it examines the relationship between and among research, practice, and values.

Descriptor Scales

Evidence: 1 - Author(s) opinion
Consumer Orientation: C - No data
Readability: III - High (Grade 12 or above)


Nobrega, A. R., Lane, J. P., Flagg, J. L., Stone, V. I. Lockett, M. M., Oddo, C., Leahy, J. A., & Usiak, D. J. (2015). Assessing the roles of national organizations in research-based knowledge creation, engagement and translation: Comparative results across three assistive technology application areas. Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefit, 9(1), 54-97.

Abstract: Research and development projects funded by scholars and government agencies are increasingly expected to demonstrate evidence of impact resulting from their efforts. Scholars traditionally relied on passive diffusion to spread their study findings out among broader communities. However, scholars are now being held accountable and are required to actively support and track the post-output paths of their research projects. Therefore, they must reach non-traditional stakeholder groups extending beyond their scholarly community. Mapping the value systems of organizations representing diverse stakeholders (i.e. Knowledge Value Mapping) is explored as a means to improve knowledge translation, thereby increasing impact. This paper expounds upon a prior analysis conducted in augmentative and alternative communication to two additional assistive technology application areas: Recreational access and wheeled mobility. The purpose is to determine the extent to which the original findings can be generalized. Results indicate that 1) findings from the initial study are, in fact, generalizable to various assistive technology fields of application; 2) national organizations are an appropriate channel for translating and disseminating new research-based knowledge to diverse stakeholders; 3) national organizations engage with knowledge mechanisms at different levels and in different capacities. These results suggest that researchers should identify organizations representing the stakeholder groups most relevant to their own area of study, and then conduct the Knowledge Value Mapping process with those organizations to identify the best approach to knowledge translation.

Descriptor Scales

Evidence: 3 - Qualitative data
Consumer Orientation: A - A- Significant data
Readability: III - High (Grade 12 or above)


Rogers, J. D. (2000). Theoretical consideration of collaboration in scientific research. In J.S. Hauger and C. McEnaney (Eds.). Strategies for Competitiveness in Academic Research (Chapter 6).     

Abstract: Rogers examines the interactions between the individual researchers and the factors that impact their research (e.g. policies of the university). Rogers endorses the concepts of "knowledge value collectives," consisting of people with varying objectives as well as individuals outside of the scientific community working across fields, disciplines, and institutions. He recommends the "knowledge value framework" as the basis to assess the impact of research because it takes into consideration the persons outside of the immediate research environment that affect the interpretation and use of the scientific work. Companion articles are available in this collection entitled, "A Churn Model of Scientific Knowledge Value: Internet Researchers as a Knowledge Value Collective" (Bozeman & Rogers, 2002) and "Public Value Mapping of Science Outcomes: Theory and Method" (Bozeman, 2003).

Descriptor Scales

Evidence: 1 - Author(s) opinion
Consumer Orientation: C - No data
Readability: III - High (Grade 12 or above)