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1. Citation: Zwi, M., Jones, H., Thorgaard, C., York, A., & Dennis, J. (2012). Parent Training Interventions for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Campbell Systematic Reviews, 8(2), 1-99. doi: 10.4073/csr.2012.2
Keywords: attention deficit disorders, hyperactivity, disability, parent training, ADHD,
Abstract: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder. For a child to be diagnosed with ADHD, adults such as parents, carers, healthcare workers or teachers must have noticed higher levels of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity in the child before the age of seven years compared to children of similar age. The inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity must be observed in a range of situations, for a substantial period of time and cause impairment to the child’s learning or social development. Parent training programmes aim to equip parents with techniques to manage their child's 'difficult' or ADHD-related behaviour (that is their inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity).

We found five randomised controlled studies that met our inclusion criteria. Four set out to improve children's general behaviour and one focused specifically on how parents could help their children make friends. All studies were small and their quality varied. Results from these studies were somewhat encouraging as far as parental stress and general child behaviour were concerned, but were uncertain with regard to other important outcomes including ADHD-related behaviour. No study provided data on the key outcomes of achievement in school, harmful effects or parent knowledge of ADHD. There was no evidence to say whether parent training is better delivered in groups or individually.

The evidence we found was limited in terms of the size of the trials and in their quality, and therefore we do not think it can be used as the basis for guidelines of treatment of ADHD in clinics or schools. We believe more research is needed and that it should ensure better reporting of the study procedures and results.
Plain Language Summary:

Parent training for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder condition, illness, medical problem (ADHD) in children aged 5 to 18 years

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder condition, illness, medical problem (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder. condition, illness, medical problem For a child to be diagnosed with ADHD, adults such as parents, carers, healthcare workers or teachers must have noticed higher levels of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity in the child before the age of seven years compared to children of similar like age. The inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity must be observed in a range of situations, for a substantial period sore, wound, infection of time and cause impairment to the child’s learning or social development. Parent training programmes aim to equip parents with techniques to manage control, direct, be in charge of, take care of, watch their child's 'difficult' or ADHD-related behaviour (that is their inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity).

We found five randomised controlled studies that met our inclusion criteria. Four set out to improve children's general behaviour and one focused specifically on how parents could help their children make friends. All studies were small and their quality varied. Results from these studies were somewhat encouraging as far as parental stress physical strain, mental strain, pressure, worry and general child behaviour were concerned, but were uncertain with regard to other important outcomes including ADHD-related behaviour. No study provided data on the key outcomes of achievement in school, harmful effects or parent knowledge of ADHD. There was no evidence to say whether parent training is better delivered in groups or individually.

The evidence we found was limited in terms of the size of the trials and in their quality, and therefore we do not think it can be used as the basis for guidelines of treatment action, medicine, therapy of ADHD in clinics or schools. We believe more research is needed and that it should ensure better reporting of the study procedures and results.

Full-Text Availability Options:Available in Campbell Library
Link to Full Text:https://campbellcollaboration.org/library/parent-training-for-adhd.html
Record Updated:2017-03-08
 

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