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1. Citation: Leite, V. F., Amadera, J. E. D., & Buehler, A. M. (2018). Viscosupplementation for hip osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy on pain and disability, and the occurrence of adverse events. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 99(3), 574-583, 583.e1.
Keywords: Arthritis, drugs, joints, literature reviews, medical treatment, outcomes, pain
Abstract: Study assessed the efficacy of viscosupplementation (hyaluronic acid [HA]) on the pain and disability caused by hip osteoarthritis, and determined the occurrence of adverse events. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov database, and specific journals were searched up to March 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing HA with any other intra-articular injection. Data extraction was performed according to Cochrane/Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria. Two authors extracted data and assessed the risk of bias and quality of evidence. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted. Eight RCTs were retrieved: 4 comparing HA to placebo; 3 to platelet-rich plasma (PRP); 3 to methylprednisolone; and 1 to mepivacaine. Some RCTs had 3 arms. There is very low evidence that HA is not superior to placebo for pain at 3 months and high evidence that it is not superior in adverse events. There is low evidence that HA is not superior to PRP for pain at 1 month. There is very low evidence that HA is not superior to PRP for pain at 6 and 12 months. There is high evidence that HA is no different from methylprednisolone for pain at 1 month. There is low evidence that HA is no different from methylprednisolone for Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials-Osteoarthritis Research Society International Responders Index at 1 month. There is high evidence that HA is no different from methylprednisolone for adverse events. The authors do not recommend viscosupplementation for hip osteoarthritis. Compared with placebo, data show scarce evidence of its efficacy up to 3 months, and suggest no difference at 6 months. However, future RCTs could present HA as an alternative to methylprednisolone for short-term symptom relief.
Full-Text Availability Options:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28803906
https://www.archives-pmr.org/article/S0003-9993(17)30535-X/pdf
Record Updated:2018-10-23
 

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